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Configure Email Forwarding for an Office 365 (Exchange Online) Mailbox – PowerShell

Configuring email forwarding for an Office 365 (Exchange Online) mailbox can be done in three ways. The user can enable email forwarding on their own using the OWA and editing their settings. This post is going to show how to enable email forwarding on a mailbox from PowerShell. If you are looking at how to complete this with the Exchange Admin Center, please see this post Configure Email Forwarding for an Office 365 (Exchange Online) Mailbox – Exchange Admin Center.

  1. Open a connection to Exchange Online with PowerShell

Make sure to replace “user@domain.com” with the user whose email you want to forward.

Make sure to replace “forward_recipient@domain.com” with the SMTP address to where you want to forward the email to.

  1. If you want to forward email and keep a copy in the local mailbox, execute this command

    Set-Mailbox -Identity “user@domain.com” -DeliverToMailboxAndForward $true
    -ForwardingSMTPAddress “forward_recipient@domain.com”

  2. If you want to forward email and don’t keep a copy in the local mailbox, execute this command

    Set-Mailbox -Identity “user@domain.com” -ForwardingSMTPAddress “forward_recipient@domain.com”

To verify this worked, run the following PowerShell command. This will display the user, the primary SMTP address and the forwarding SMTP address.

Get-Mailbox -Identity “user@domain.com” Format-List DisplayName,PrimarySMTPAddress,ForwardingSMTPAddress

Configure Email Forwarding for an Office 365 (Exchange Online) Mailbox – Exchange Admin Center

Configuring email forwarding for an Office 365 (Exchange Online) mailbox can be done in three ways. The user can enable email forwarding on their own using the OWA and editing their settings. This post is going to show how to enable email forwarding on a mailbox from the Exchange Admin Center. If you are looking at how to complete this with PowerShell, please see this post Configure Email Forwarding for an Office 365 (Exchange Online) Mailbox – PowerShell.

  1. Open Office 365 Admin Center
  2. Navigate to the Exchange Admin Center
  3. Click Recipients
  4. Click Mailboxes
  5. Select the user
  6. Double click the user or click the edit pencil

  7. Click Mailbox Features
  8. Scroll down to Mail Flow and Click View Details

  9. Click to Enable Forwarding
  10. Click Browse and select a user to forward the mail to.
    1. Internal – Select a user from the GAL
    2. External – Select a user from the GAL that is a mail contact or mail user. If the contact or mail enabled user is not there, please use this post to create one.
  11. Choose if you want to keep a copy of the message in the mailbox. By default, the forward won’t keep a copy in the mailbox, it will just forward to the forwarding address
  12. Click OK

Forcing Retention Policy to Run – Office 365 (Exchange Online)

Recently I have been tasked with setting up a pretty complete set of Retention Policies. Rather than waiting for the automatic MRM process to run on its own schedule, we can force it to run using PowerShell.

The KB from Microsoft for the PowerShell command is: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa998864(v=exchg.160).aspx

 

  1. Connect to Exchange Online with PowerShell
  2. Run the following command
    1. Start-ManagedFolderAssistant -Identity “user@domain.com”
    2. Make sure to update “user@domain.com” to the user you want to trigger MRM on.

This will trigger MRM to start to process the mailbox specified.

Where is my data, Office 365/Azure?

Here is a quick and easy way to find the high-level information on where your data is stored. As we know, Microsoft has multiple data centers around the globe. Microsoft will use the country specified, when opening the tenant, as a location for the data. In saying that there are some of the Office 365 services that are not offered in all Microsoft data centers, so you will have to piece together your data location. Exchange, SharePoint and Skype can we seen from the Office 365 Admin center.

Open the Office 365 Admin Center

Expand Settings

Expand Organization Profile

Scroll down to data location

To view the specifics about what Microsoft services are available in your specified region, please use this site.

Where is my data (Microsoft Site)

Office 365 (Exchange Online) Archive Mailbox Size Reporting (PowerShell)

Here are some quick PowerShell commands to report on the size of the Office 365 (Exchange Online) Archive Mailbox size.

Microsoft has this information published in the following KB: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg576861(v=exchsrvcs.149).aspx

Open a connection to Exchange Online with PowerShell.

The command below will get the get the display name, total archive size and total item count for a specified user:

Get-MailboxStatistics <Identity> -ArchiveFormat-List DisplayName,TotalItemSize,ItemCount

The command below will get the get the display name, total archive size and total item count for all users and then out put the results to a CSV:

Get-Mailbox -Archive -ResultSize Unlimited Get-MailboxStatistics -Archive Select DisplayName,@{name=“TotalItemSize (MB)”;expression={[math]::Round((($_.TotalItemSize.Value.ToString()).Split(“(“)[1].Split(” “)[0].Replace(“,”,“”)/1MB),2)}},ItemCountSort “TotalItemSize (MB)” -Descending Export-Csv C:\Path\FileName.csv” -NoTypeInformation

Office 365 (Exchange Online) Archive Mailbox Size Reporting (Portal)

To view the size of an Office 365 (Exchange Online) Archive mailbox in the Office 365 portal, follow the instructions below:

If you are looking on how to complete this in PowerShell, please use this article.

Open the Office 365 Admin Portal

Open the Exchange Admin Center

Click Recipients

Click Mailboxes

Select the User Mailbox

Click View Detail in the In-Place Archive

Details are displayed

Un-Encrypted PST Import (Network Upload) to Office 365

This is a complete step-by-step for using the Office 365 Import Service to upload an un-encrypted PST File to Office 365.

Please review the Microsoft documentation for this process for updates or changes to this process.

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt644809.aspx

Pre-Requisites

Mailbox Import Export Role – In order to perform the import, the account doing the import needs to be assigned the Mailbox Import Export role. This is easily accomplished by adding the role to the Organization Management role group (as seen in the screen shot). Alternatively, you can create a new role group and assign your account permissions.

Open Exchange Admin Center

(1) Click Permissions

(2) Click Admin Roles

(3) Double Click Organization Management

(4) Click + Roles

(5) Select Mailbox Import Export

(6) Click Add ->

(7) Click OK

(8) Click Save

PST File Share – The PST file(s) that are being imported (because you can import more than one at a time), need to be stored on a network file share, or a file share on your local PC. Note the syntax in the later steps with AZCopy.exe.

Storage Key and Upload URL – During the process below, you are given a storage key and an upload URL. Keep these secure and treat the just like a password. If they fall into the wrong hands, anyone can upload to your tenant.

 

Step-by-Step Process for an Un-Encrypted PST Import (Network Upload) to Office 365

 

  • Download Network Upload Tool (AzCopy.exe)

In order to upload PST files to Microsoft, you must download and install the AzCopy.exe tool. Follow the process below to download and install the tool.

Navigate to https://protection.office.com

Sign in with a Global Admin account for your organization

(1) Click Data Management

(2) Click Import

(3) Click Go to the Import Service

(4) Click

(5) Click Upload Files Over the Network

On the popup page, click Download Tool (Azure AzCopy tool)

Click Run

Click Next

Agree to the EULA

Click Next

Accept the default install location

Click Next

Click Install

Click Yes

Click Finish

  • Storage Key and Upload URL

Before we can use the AzCopy tool to upload the PST file(s) to Office 365, we need to get the upload secure key and the URL. Please use the steps below to get the key and URL specific to your tenant.

Open the Import Data to Office 365 page that we had open the the prvious step

Click the icon

***NOTE*** This is a secure key and URL. Treat this like a password and make sure that it’s kept secure.

Click Copy Key (note this this process can take up to 5 minutes to complete)

Click Show URL for PST Files

Copy the key and URL for use in the next step

  • Upload the PST File(s) to Office 365

Now that we have the AzCopy tool downloaded and installed and we have the secure key and URL, can now upload the PST file(s) to Office 365. Follow the steps below to upload the PST file(s) to Office 365.

Open a command prompt as an admin (on the machine where you installed AzCopy)

Open the directory where you installed AzCopy

Run the following command to start the PST File(s) upload

AzCopy.exe /Source:\\SERVER01\PSTshare /Dest:<URL COPIED FROM STEP ABOVE>/SERVER01/PSTshare/ /Destkey:<SECURE KEY COPIED FROM STEP ABOVE> /S /V:C:\PSTshare\Uploadlog.log

\\SERVER01\PSTshare This denotes the share in which your PST File(s) are placed. If there are multiple PST Files in this location, AzCopy will upload them all.

<URL COPIED FROM STEP ABOVE> This denotes the URL that we got from Office 365 in the step above.

<SECURE KEY COPIED FROM STEP ABOVE> This denotes the secure key that we got from Office 365 in the step above.

C:\PSTshare\Uploadlog.log This denotes a location on the local machine where the verbose log file can be written

If you need additional help or need further explanation on the command above, please use this Microsoft site. https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt644809.aspx

 

  • Create the PST Mapping File

Now that the PST File(s) are uploaded to Office 365, we need to create a CSV file that will map the PST file to the mailbox in Office 365. Follow the steps below to create the CSV file.

Download the PST Mapping Template File from Microsoft

Complete the CSV file with your specific information, filling in as many lines as needed. One line per PST file uploaded.

***Note **** If you need additional help or need further explanation on the PST Mapping File, please use this Microsoft site.

Save the PST Mapping File

 

  • Create the Office 365 Import Job

Now that we have the data uploaded and the PST mapping file saved, we can create the import job in Office 365 that will take the mapping file and import the PST files to the mailboxes specified. Follow the steps below to complete the process.

Navigate to https://protection.office.com

Sign in with a Global Admin account for your organization

(1) Click Data Management

(2) Click Import

(3) Click Go to the Import Service

(4) Click

(5) Click Upload Files Over the Network

(6) Check * I’m done uploading my files

(7) Check * I have access to the mapping file

(8) Click Next

(9) Enter a Job Name

(10) Click Next

(11) Click + to Add the Mapping File

(12) Validate the Mapping File (Under 100 rows)

(13) Agree to the terms and conditions

(14) Click Finish

(15) Click Closed

The import will now start. You can check the status of the import by going to the Office 365 Admin Center and opening the Import tab. Use the refresh button to get the updated status.

Monitor the status column for completion or error. My upload below completed with skipped items. Clicking on the job and the selecting View Details will allow you to troubleshoot the status message. With my example below, I had one corrupted mail item and this was discovered with a detailed log provided with the upload.

 

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps Office365 MVP

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