Category Archives: Exchange Server

Create a Shared Mailbox from an Existing Synced User Account

The benefits of using the process is that it will allow you to have Shared mailboxes (info@, support@, ect..) and not be charged with a license from Office 365.

Connect to Exchange Online with Remote PowerShell

  1. Click Start

     

  2. Click Administrative Tools

     

  3. Right Click Windows PowerShell Modules and Run as administrator

     

  4. Set the Execution Policy on the local computer
    1. Set-ExecutionPolicy -ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned
    2. Press “Y” for yes when/if prompted

       

  5. Specify remote credentials through a variable
    1. $cred=Get-Credential
    2. Enter Global Admin Account
    3. Enter password

       

  6. Set a session variable and connect to Exchange Online, enter command
    1. $s =New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri https://ps.outlook.com/powershell -Credential $cred -Authentication Basic –AllowRedirection

       

  7. Import the session with the variable set in previous step.
    1. $importresults =Import-PSSession $s

 

Setup Shared Mailbox

  1. Convert the existing Synced user to a Shared Mailbox
    1. Get-Mailbox -identity account@domainname.com
      | set-mailbox -type “Shared”

       

  2. Set the quota for Shared Mailboxes
    1. Set-Mailbox account@domainname.com -ProhibitSendReceiveQuota 5GB -ProhibitSendQuota 4.75GB -IssueWarningQuota 4.5GB

       

  3. Setup the Security Group

     

  4. Create a security group for the users who need access to the shared mailbox
    1. Open Exchange Control Panel
    2. Select My Organization > Users & Groups > Distribution Groups > New.
    3. Specify a display name (Example: GDP_dg) (Descriptive Name and DG for Distribution Group)
    4. Specify an Alias (GDP_dg)
    5. Specify an e-mail address. (GDP_dg@contoso.com)
    6. Select the Make this group a security group check box.

       

Note After you create a security group, the membership is closed. When membership is closed, only group owners can add members to the security group, or owners have to approve requests to join the group. Additionally, only group owners can remove members from the security group.

  1. In the Ownership section, click Add to add an owner, if necessary.

     

  2. In the Membership section, click Add.

     

  3. In the Select Members page, select the users you want to add.

     

  4. Click OK.

     

  5. On the New Group page, click Save.

     

Assign Permissions (PowerShell connected to Office 365)

  1. Assign the security group the FullAccess permission to access the shared mailbox
    1. Add-MailboxPermission account@domainname.com -User SecurityDistributionGroup -AccessRights FullAccess

     

  2. Assign the security group the SendAs permission to the shared mailbox
    1. Add-RecipientPermission account@domainname.com -Trustee SecurityDistributionGroup -AccessRights SendAs

       

  3. Hide the Distribution Security Group from the Global Address List
    1. Open Exchange Control Panel
    2. Select My Organization > Users & Groups > Distribution Groups
    3. Select the group that you created in the above step
    4. Select Hide this group from the shared address book
    5. Click Save

 

Once the above steps are completed, you can open the Microsoft Online Portal, click Users, Select the User account for the Shared Mailbox and remove the license.

 

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

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Using Exchange Deployment Assistant to Help Plan a Migration to Office 365

I am a planner, I really don’t like to walk into situations not prepared.

When I am doing an assessment for a company, I will always get the client to set goals; Current State and Future State. When you have clear goals from the client, there is less likely to be a surprise along the way. Take your time and plan the migration well. You and your client cannot afford downtime during the migration

Let’s walk through a typical migration to Office 365.

Current State:

  • 1500 Users Accounts that are mail enabled
  • 15 – Windows Server 2003 SP2 Servers (2 DCs, 3 File/Print Cluster, 3 Exchange Cluster, 1 FW, 1 SharePoint, etc…)
  • 4 – Exchange Server 2003 SP2 (2 WFE and 2 BE Clustered)
  • Windows XP SP3 w/ Office 2000
  • 15 Physical Servers

Future State:

  • 1500 User Accounts in Office 365 on Enterprise Plan E3
  • SharePoint Online
  • Lync Online
  • Exchange Online
  • File and Print to remain on premise
  • Replace 15 physical servers with 3 new physical servers
  • 3 new physical servers running Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise (Enterprise is key, because it gives you the licenses to run 4 virtual servers)
  • 10 new virtual servers
  • I will then Visio the solution. (Note: this one only shows the ADFS and DirSync setup)

One of the tools in my belt is the Exchange Server Deployment Assistant. This is an online tool from Microsoft that allows you to enter information about your current Exchange environment, your future Exchange environment and then it will spit out a beautiful plan for you to follow.

Exchange Server Deployment Assistant

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/exdeploy2010/default.aspx#Index

Select the End Goal for Exchange, for us this is Hybrid. The reason that we choose this and not Cloud only is because we want that Hybrid server for Migration purposes. We are not going to move 1500 accounts over night. When the migration is complete, the Exchange 2010 Hybrid server will be removed.

What is your current on-premises mail system? Exchange Server 2003

The next four questions are customizable depending on your goals

Do you want all users to use their on-premises credentials when they log on to their Exchange Online mailbox?

Do you want to route inbound mail for both your on-premises and Exchange Online mailboxes through your on-premises organization?

Do you want mail sent between Exchange Online and your on-premises organizations to go through an Edge Transport server in your perimeter network?

Do you already use Forefront Online Protection for Exchange to protect your on-premises mailboxes?

Once you click next it will compile a custom plan for you, to move to Office 365. This online checklist will remember your choices as you check them off. You can also download a PDF of the plan.

 

INSERT PLAN HERE

 

What I love about this is that includes detailed actions that you can share with the client and some nice pics that can be used to show the client the setup and mail flow during the migration.

Happy Migrating… :)

 

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

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Remote Wipe Phones Connected to Exchange Online

I had a first chance the other day, to do something that I have often wondered how well it worked. We I can now say that this feature is really cool and works really well.

A client of mine called in a panic, because his phone has been stolen. He had some sensitive data on the phone and wanted to know if there was a way to track the phone. I offered him a better solution, wipe the device so that all the data is gone. He probably wasn’t getting his phone back and he has all the data backed up, he was happy to use this feature. Since I was on the road, I was able to talk him through the process.

This can be used by both the administrator and the user of the device.

By the user:

  1. Login to OWA (http://www.outlook.com/domainname.com)
  2. Click Options (top right)
  3. Click See all options…
  4. Click Phone (Left hand side)
  5. Select your Device
  6. Click Wipe Device

At this point you will get a few more prompts making sure that you want to wipe the device.

By the Administrator:

  1. Login to the MOP (http://portal.microsoftonline.com)
  2. Open the ECP (Exchange Control Panel)
  3. Find and Double Click the user, to open the Properties
  4. Expand Phone & Voice Features
  5. Double Click Exchange ActiveSync
  6. Select the Device
  7. Click Wipe Device

At this point you will get a few more prompts making sure that you want to wipe the device.

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

Email Me Follow me on Twitter Connect with me on LinkedIN Facebook Me

Items that are Deleted from a Shared Mailbox go to the Wrong Folder in Outlook

I have had this question a number of times, because small businesses seem to love their shared mailboxes. I guess Microsoft has seen this issue a number of times too, because they have just releases a KB that documents the problem and resolution.

The issue occurs when multiple people have access to a shared mailbox. If one of those people should delete an email in that shared mailbox, the deleted item will go into your Deleted Items folder rather than that of the mailbox owner or Shared Mailbox.

Rather than re-typing an entire KB, the following section is copied and pasted from this KB. Thanks to Microsoft.

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/202517

 

SUMMARY

When using one of the Microsoft Outlook products listed at the beginning of this article, you delete items from a Mailbox folder of another user where you have deletion privileges, and the deleted items go into your Deleted Items folder rather than that of the mailbox owner.

Let me fix it myself

To change the registry setting, follow these steps:

  • In Outlook 2002, Outlook 2003, Outlook 2007, or Outlook 2010 click Exit on the File menu.In Outlook 2000, click Exit and Log Off on the File menu.


     

  • Click Start, and then click Run.

     

     

  • Type regedit, and then click OK.

     

  • Locate the registry key below that is appropriate for your version of Outlook.
    • For Outlook 2010
    • HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\14.0\Outlook\Options\General

     

    • For Outlook 2007
    • HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\12.0\Outlook\Options\General

     

    • For Outlook 2003
    • HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\11.0\Outlook\Options\General

     

    • For Outlook 2002:
    • HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\10.0\Outlook\Options\General

     

    • For Outlook 2000:
    • HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\9.0\Outlook\Options\General

       

  • Right-click the DelegateWastebasketStyle value, and then click Modify.If the key is not present, use the following steps to create it:


    • Right-click the General folder in the path defined in step 4 in the “To Switch the Destination of Deleted Items” section earlier in this article.
    • Point to New, and then click DWORD Value.
    • Type DelegateWastebasketStyle, and then press ENTER.

     

  • Change the value data in the Edit DWORD Value dialog box to one of the following values:
    • 8 = Stores deleted items in your folder.
    • 4 = Stores deleted items in the mailbox owner’s folder.

    Note Make sure that the delegate user has at least Author level rights for the Deleted Items folder of the owner’s mailbox. If the delegate does not have these rights, and this registry option is set to 4, then either the item is deleted permanently or the user receives one of the following two error messages:

    The item could not be deleted, it was either moved or already deleted, or access was denied.

    or

    Operation Failed.


    Note In Outlook 2007 or in Outlook 2010, the user receives one of the following two error message if DelegateWastebasketStyle=4, and the delegate does not have at least Author permission to the Deleted Items folder in the owner’s mailbox.

    Some items cannot be deleted. They were either moved or already deleted, or access was denied.
    or

    Could not complete the deletion. The items may have been already deleted or moved.

  • Quit Registry Editor.

     

  • Restart Outlook.

Determine if DelegateWasteBasketStyle has been applied using a group policy

If the above registry value has no effect, an administrator may have applied the setting using a group policy. Group policy registry values override those that are configured in the user settings section of the registry.

Office user settings are located in the following registry key path:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office


Office group policy setting are located in the following registry key path:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Office

If you find the DelegateWasteBasketStyle value exists in the HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Office\xx.x\Outlook\Options\General subkey (where xx.x is the version number of Office as it appears in the table below), it is likely because group policies are used in your organization. To review group policies that apply to your user or computer account, contact your Active Directory administrator.

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

Email Me Follow me on Twitter Connect with me on LinkedIN Facebook Me

Advanced Email Migration to Office 365 from a POP3 Service Provider – Part 5

 

Client Setup and Data Migration

Now that we have email flowing into Office 365 for userid@contoso.com, we need to import all the old email, contacts and calendar items to Office 365.

Set up and Configure Office Desktop Apps

This setup will install the Microsoft Online Services Sign-in Assistant and help configure Outlook, SharePoint and Lync 2010. It will also install any updates critical for these applications to function with Office 365.

  1. Open Internet Explorer to https://portal.microsoftonline.com

  2. Login with your federated user account (userid@contoso.com)
  3. Click Downloads
  4. Right side of the page, located under Resources
  5. Browse to ‘Set up and configure your Office desktop apps’
  6. Click Setup button
    • Located under “Set up and configure your Office desktop apps”
    • Run the installer and it will guide you through the installation

Setup Outlook to Connect to Office 365

 

  1. In order to move email from the current POP3 solution to Exchange Online (Office 365) we need to import your current email for the POP3 PST within Outlook. All the steps are completed within Outlook 2010.
  2. Setup Outlook Profile for Office 365
  3. Click Start
  4. Open Control Panel
  5. Click Mail
  6. Click Show Profiles
  7. Click Add…
  8. Enter a new profile name
  9. Click OK
  10. Enter your Name
  11. Enter your Email Address
  12. Enter your password
  13. Click Next
  14. Verify you get three green check marks and click Finish
  15. The Mail Control Panel will open
  16. Verify that ‘Always use this profile’ is checked
  17. Verify that the new profile you just created is selected. If not, use the drop down menu and select it.
  18. Click OK

Login to Office 365 with Outlook and Import Email

  1. Open Outlook 2010
  2. Enter your username and password, click OK
    1. userid@contoso.com
    2. Domain Password
  3. Click the File menu
  4. Navigate to Open

  5. Click Import (as shown in the screenshot below)
  6. Select Import from another program or file click Next.
  7. Select Outlook Data File (.pst) and click Next.
  8. Browse to and select the exported file, click Next.
  9. Enter the password. Click OK
  10. Select the folder to import from (don’t change any settings)
  11. Verify Include subfolders is checked

  12. Click Finished

Note – This process will import all the contents from your PST file into Office 365. After this you can remove the PST file and forget about them. Office 365 has 25GB mailboxes.

Series of Posts

  1. Advanced Email Migration to Office 365 from a POP3 Service Provider – Part 1
  2. Office 365 and DNS Setup for the Transition Email Domain – Part 2
  3. Adding an Email Alias to an AD Account and Syncing Changes to Office 365 – Part 3
  4. POP3 Email Forwarding to Office 365 – Part 4
  5. Client Setup and Data Migration – Part 5

 

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

Email Me Follow me on Twitter Connect with me on LinkedIN Facebook Me

Advanced Email Migration to Office 365 from a POP3 Service Provider – Part 4

 

POP3 Email Forwarding to Office 365

Now that we have the user active in Office 365 with both the primary and transition (vanity) domain setup, we can now setup the POP3 Provider to forward all incoming email for userid@contoso.com to userid@mail.contoso.com.

This step is done many different ways, because there are many different POP3 providers. Below is instructions for my POP3 provider (Shaw Communications)

  1. Login to Shaw Webmail with the user account you want to migrate

     

  2. Click Settings

     

  3. Click Mail Settings

     

  4. Enable Mail Forwarding

     

  5. Enable ‘Do not leave copy on server’

     

  6. Enter userid@mail.contoso.com, click Add

     

  7. Click Save

     


 

We are now at the point where we can test.

  1. Send an email to userid@mail.contoso.com (preferably from an external email account – Hotmail works great)
    1. Verify delivery in Office 365 – Outlook Web Access

       

  2. Send an email to userid@contoso.com (preferably from an external email account – Hotmail works great)
    1. Verify delivery in Office 365 – Outlook Web Access

       

  3. Have another POP3 user, from the current provider, send an email to the migrated user (userid@contoso.com)
    1. Verify delivery in Office 365 – Outlook Web Access

       

  4. Reply from Office 365 to the user that just sent the test message from the current POP3 provider

     

  5. Send an email from Office 365 to another user on the current POP3 provider

 

 

Series of Posts

  1. Advanced Email Migration to Office 365 from a POP3 Service Provider – Part 1
  2. Office 365 and DNS Setup for the Transition Email Domain – Part 2
  3. Adding an Email Alias to an AD Account and Syncing Changes to Office 365 – Part 3
  4. POP3 Email Forwarding to Office 365 – Part 4
  5. Client Setup and Data Migration – Part 5

 

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

Email Me Follow me on Twitter Connect with me on LinkedIN Facebook Me

Advanced Email Migration to Office 365 from a POP3 Service Provider – Part 3


Adding an Email Alias to an AD Account and Syncing Changes to Office 365

In the previous post, we setup configured the primary and transition domains in Office 365.

In this post we are going to make the changes to the AD account, Sync the changes to Office 365 and activate the user in Office 365.

Because Office 365 limits us from adding email aliases, for vanity domains, to users; we need to make the changes on the AD account and sync them to Office 365. These changes are done with ADSI Edit and modifying the proxyAddresses field on the AD user account.

  1. Select a user account to migrate to Office 365
  2. Open ADSI Edit
  3. Connect to the domain and navigate to the User OU
  4. Navigate to the User Account
  5. Right Click, Properties
  6. Find and Click the proxyAddresses field
  7. Click Edit
  8. Add SMTP aliases (both contoso.com and mail.contoso.com)
  • When you add new email aliases, you want to make sure that you primary address will start with UPPERCASE SMTP. Your additional addesses will start with lower case smtp. The uppercase SMTP denotes it as the primary address.
  • Examples:
  • SMTP:userid@contoso.com
  • smtp:user@mail.contoso.com
  • Assuming that userid is the same as the current email address.
  1. Click OK
  2. Click Apply
  3. Click OK

Now that we have the user account email aliases are setup we need to sync those changes to the user account in Office 365. Once the account is synced, then activate and license the account in Office 365.

  1. Login to the Directory Sync Server and sync the changes (Start-OnlineCoexistenceSync)

    WAIT 5 minutes for the changes to Sync to Office 365

  • Open IE and navigate to Office 365 Portal and login with the admin account
  • Click Users
  • Check mark the user that you want to activate
  • Click Activate Synced Users
  • Select a location
  • Assign a License
  • Click Next
  • Click Activate
  • Click Finish

WAIT 5 minutes for Microsoft Office 365 to process the account activation and provision the licensed services to the user

If you navigate to the user account in the Exchange Online Control Panel and view the properties of the user account, the SMTP aliases should be listed (both contoso.com and mail.contoso.com)

Now that the user is activated and has both SMTP aliases we can continue to the next step and forward the email from the legacy provider to Office 365

Series of Posts

  1. Advanced Email Migration to Office 365 from a POP3 Service Provider – Part 1
  2. Office 365 and DNS Setup for the Transition Email Domain – Part 2
  3. Adding an Email Alias to an AD Account and Syncing Changes to Office 365 – Part 3
  4. POP3 Email Forwarding to Office 365 – Part 4
  5. Client Setup and Data Migration – Part 5

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

Email Me Follow me on Twitter Connect with me on LinkedIN Facebook Me