Category Archives: General

Directory Sync 64bit now Available

Previously there was no option, but to install the 32bit version. Microsoft released the 64bit version.


 

 

The following section is a repost from this site…

http://community.office365.com/en-us/w/sso/555.aspx


The 64-bit version of the directory synchronization tool is now available. The 64-bit version now uses Forefront Identity Manager 2010 as the underlying synchronization engine.

To download the 64-bit version of the directory synchronization tool from the Office 365 portal:

In the header, click Admin.

On the Admin page, in the left pane, click Users.

At the top of the Users page, click the link next to Active Directory synchronization.

Under step 4, select Windows 64-bit version, and then click Download.

To run the 64-bit version of the directory synchronization tool, you must have the following software installed:

The 64-bit edition of the Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard or Enterprise operating systems.

The 64-bit version of the directory synchronization tool shares exact functional parity with the existing 32-bit software. Therefore, refer to the existing directory synchronization documentation for all other deployment and configuration information.

Upgrading from 32-bit directory synchronization tool

Although the functionality of the 64-bit version of the directory synchronization tool is identical to the 32-bit version, the underlying SQL schema is different. For this reason, you cannot perform a standard upgrade. To upgrade your 32-bit installation of the directory synchronization tool, you must first uninstall it, and then install the 64-bit tool on a new computer.

Although the 32-bit instance of the directory synchronization tool is removed, the overall state of the objects in your on-premises and cloud directories, respectively, is preserved. When you install and configure your 64-bit instance of the directory synchronization tool, it finds and matches objects in the cloud with on-premises objects. However, the 64-bit instance of the tool will not find and match objects in the cloud if on-premises object deletions occurred when the 32-bit instance of the directory synchronization tool was offline.

Therefore, you must minimize changes to your on-premises objects during the upgrade to the 64-bit instance of the directory synchronization tool.

On the computer on which the Directory Synchronization tool is installed, open the Control Panel, select Add and Remove Programs, and then uninstall the Directory Synchronization tool.

Note:
If a synchronization session is in progress, a warning message appears when you try to remove the Directory Synchronization tool. If you receive this warning, wait until synchronization is complete, and then repeat this step.

Install the 64-bit version of the Directory Synchronization tool installation file on another computer. To do this, sign in to the Office 365 portal, click Admin in the header, click Users under Management in the left pane, click Set up in the Users pane, select Windows 64-bit version, and then click the Download button for step 4: Install and configure the Directory Synchronization tool.

On the last page of the installation program, select Start Configuration Wizard now, and then click Finish.
The Microsoft Online Services Directory Configuration Wizard starts.

 

 

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

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About Me

MVP

 

I have had a few emails come in asking about me and my background. I have two passions right now, keeping my Office 365 MVP and losing weight. I run this blog and another wieghtloss blog called Fat Guy Slimming.

I started in IT by trial and error when I was 15 years old on my IBM Aptiva computer. I still remember the day that I got it; Christmas morning (I know cliché, but hey). She was a beauty. 486 DX2 66mhz, 4MB of RAM and 256MB hard drive. The selling point for me was the 2x CDROM drive. It was preloaded with IBM DOS and Windows 3.11.

Intel 486DX2-66 - haut

After breaking and fixing that computer multiple times, my interest was sparked. During and after high school I ​took a Microcomputer Systems Technician course from a local vocational school, in the hopes of making between 10$ and 12$ per hour fixing computers at a local shop. I finished that course with my A+ and one job offer for 7$ per hour. Back to school I went…

A few years later after saving up money I took a Network Engineer Professional course at another vocational school. When I finished course I was now Microsoft certified and ready to rule the world… really I was. I was going to find a good job and move out of my mom’s house. My certifications at that point were:

  • MCSE on Windows NT 4.0
  • MCP on Exchange Server 5.5 and Windows 98
  • Network+

It was at this point that I was interviewed by EDS and ended up getting the job there doing local desktop support for the local EDS office in Winnipeg. I ended up working 10 years with EDS and eventually HP working my way up the chain from Desktop Support, to Server Support and then into an elite Microsoft team that takes third level call from all EDS/HP accounts. We were tasked to resolve the issues that couldn’t be fixed by the local team or send them to Microsoft for resolve.

Working at EDS/HP I kept up with my certifications:

  • MCSE on Windows 2000
  • MCP on Exchange Server 2000
  • MCSE on Windows 2003
  • MCSA on Windows 2003
  • MCP on Exchange Server 2003, Windows XP and Windows Vista
  • MCITP – Enterprise Administrator 2008

Things at HP got real dark and I lost my passion to work there, when the business model changed and was more focus was put on the bottom line and moving jobs to out of the country. So, after 10 years I decided it was time to move on.

I joined Imaginet, a local Winnipeg company that was growing leaps and bounds. I was at Imaginet for over a year and I really loved it there. They are a people company and when their people are happy, the customers are happy. I was really focused on Office 365, Exchange Server 2010 and Lync Server 2010. While I was with Imaginet I kept working on certifications and learning new things. This included Office 365.

I ended up leaving Imaginet and rejoining HP. I am working in the same group as when I left HP before. Things are better at HP now and I am really happy working from home.

My current certifications:

  • MCITP – Enterprise Administrator 2008
  • MCITP – Enterprise Messaging Administrator 2010
  • MCTS – Lync Server 2010
  • MCTS – Microsoft Virtualization

On April 1st 2013, I was awarded Most Valuable Professional for Office 365 by Microsoft. I am really  pleased with this award, because I have worked really hard over the past few years to create this BLOG, be active on the Office 365 User Community and other local engagements.

MVP_award

 

 

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

Email Me Follow me on Twitter Connect with me on LinkedIN Facebook Me