Category Archives: Get to know the NEW Office 365

Setting up AD FS Proxy Servers for Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365

If we review our network diagram again, we can see that there are AD FS Proxy servers placed in a DMZ network. These severs are required for external client authentication. This is needed when you have clients that need to access Office 365 services (when SSO is enabled), while outside the internal network. Meaning the client that are working remotely. If you did not have AD FS proxy servers in place, then no external clients would be able to authenticate.

Authentication Process:

  • Internal Requests —> Intranet (sts.domain.com – 192.168.0.x) —> Resolves to the  AD FS Server —> Authenticated with the Domain Controller
  • External Requests —> Internet (sts.domain.com – 24.88.56.x) —> Resolves to the  AD FS Proxy Server —> Forwards Request to AD FS Server —> Authenticated with Domain Controller

Networking setup for these servers is very easy. We have an A record setup (sts.domain.com) in our public DNS that resolves to an internet accessible IP address. This IP address should be configured as an external interface on your firewall. You are going to want to forward requests for sts.domain.com (port 443) from the external interface on the firewall to the AD FS server. Next, you are going to want to enable bi-directional communication between the AD FS server and the AD FS Proxy Server.

Networking

  • Internal Client Requests —> Intranet (sts.domain.com – 192.168.0.x) (TCP/443) —> AD FS Server (TCP/443)
  • External Client Requests —> Internet (sts.domain.com – 24.88.56.x) (TCP/443) —> Firewall —>  AD FS Proxy Server  (TCP/443) —> Firewall —> AD FS Server (TCP/443)

 

 

Complete Series:

Getting to know the NEW Office 365

  1. Does Microsoft have FREE training for the NEW Office 365?
  2. Signing up for the NEW Office 365
  3. Adding and Verifying a Domain for the NEW Office 365
  4. Creating Cloud Users for the NEW Office 365
  5. Configuring Desktops for the NEW Office 365
  6. Exchange 2003 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  7. Exchange 2007 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  8. Setting up AD FS and Enabling Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  9. Setting up AD FS Proxy Servers for Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  10. Setting up Directory Synchronization with the NEW Office 365
  11. Activating and Licensing a Synchronized User in the NEW Office 365
  12. Testing Single Sign-on to the NEW Office 365
  13. Making the Single Sign-On Solution Highly Available
  14. Exchange Hybrid Deployment with the NEW Office 365

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

Email Me Follow me on Twitter Connect with me on LinkedIN Facebook Me

Part 3 – Federate with the NEW Office 365

Now that we have the required software installed and the certificate in place, we can finally configure the AD FS role and federate with Microsoft.

 

Configure Local AD FS Federation Server

 

  1. Open Server Manager

     

  2. Click Tools

     

  3. Click AD FS Management

     

  4. Click AD FS Federation Server Configuration Wizard

     

  5. Create a new Federation Service

     

  6. New Federation Server FarmChoose this option all the time, even if you only plan on deploying one server. If you choose Stand-alone federation server, then you won’t be able to add more servers.

     

  7. Click Next

     

  8. SSL Certificate – This should be pre-populated. If it isn’t, go back and assign/bind the third party certificate to the default web site

     

  9. Federation Service Name – This should match the SSL certificate name

     

    *** NOTE *** Since I am using a multi-name certificate in a lab environment, my SSL certificate name and Federation Service name don’t match. This is not recommended for production environments. Use best practices always; a single name certificate.

     

  10. Click Next

     

  11. Enter the AD FS service account name and password

     

  12. Click Next

     

  13. Click Next

     

  14. All green check marks mean everything is setup correctly

     

  15. Click Close

 

Configure Federation Trust with Office 365

 

Now that we have our side of the federation setup, we can complete the federation with Office 365

  • Open the Desktop on the AD FS server

     

  • Windows Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell

     

  • Right Click and Run As Administrator

     

  • Set the credential variable
    • $cred=Get-Credential

     

  • Enter a Global Administrator account from Office 365. I have a dedicated tenant (@domain.onmicrosoft.com) service account setup for AD FS and Directory Syncronization.

     

  • Connect to Microsoft Online Services with the credential variable set previously
    • Connect-MsolService –Credential $cred

 

  • Set the MSOL ADFS Context server, to the ADFS server
    • Set-MsolADFSContext –Computer adfs_servername.domain_name.com

 

  • Convert the domain to a federated domain
    • Convert-MsolDomainToFederated –DomainName domain_name.com

 

  • Successful Federation
    • Successfully updated ‘domain_name.com‘ domain.

 

  • Verify federation
    • Get-MsolFederationProperty –DomainName domain_name.com

This completes the setup for federation to Office 365. Keep in mind that before you can successfully use single sign-on with Office 365, you will need to setup and configure Directory Synchronization. After Directory Synchronization is setup, you will have to license the synchronized user in Office 365. This will provision the services for the user. If they want to access Office 365 from outside the internal network, the AD FS Proxy server needs to be setup and configured.

 

Complete Series:

Getting to know the NEW Office 365

  1. Does Microsoft have FREE training for the NEW Office 365?
  2. Signing up for the NEW Office 365
  3. Adding and Verifying a Domain for the NEW Office 365
  4. Creating Cloud Users for the NEW Office 365
  5. Configuring Desktops for the NEW Office 365
  6. Exchange 2003 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  7. Exchange 2007 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  8. Setting up AD FS and Enabling Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  9. Setting up AD FS Proxy Servers for Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  10. Setting up Directory Synchronization with the NEW Office 365
  11. Activating and Licensing a Synchronized User in the NEW Office 365
  12. Testing Single Sign-on to the NEW Office 365
  13. Making the Single Sign-On Solution Highly Available
  14. Exchange Hybrid Deployment with the NEW Office 365

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

Email Me Follow me on Twitter Connect with me on LinkedIN Facebook Me

Part 2 – Request, Fulfill, Complete and Assign a Third Party Certificate

Setting up AD FS requires the use of a third party SSL certificate. Please see this BLOG post for certificate requirements. In a production situation, I would recommend that a single name SSL certificate. Wildcard and multi-name certificates will work, but I like to keep things simple and use a standard SSL certificate in a production situation. Make sure that the common name matches what you plan to call the AD FS server farm. Microsoft best practices recommends that you use the host name, STS (secure token service). In the example below, I have used the value sts.domain.com.

 

Create the SSL Certificate Request (CSR)

 

  1. Open Server Manager

     

  2. Click Tools

     

  3. Click Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager

     

  4. Select the local server

     

  5. Select Server Certificates

     

  6. Click Open Feature (actions pane)

     

  7. Click Create Certificate Request

     

  8. Fill out the certificate request properties. Make sure that the common name matches what you plan to call the AD FS server farm. Microsoft best practices recommends that you use the host name STS (secure token service). In the example below, I have used the value sts.domain.com.

     

  9. Click Next

     

  10. Leave the Cryptographic service provider at the default

     

  11. Change the Bit Length to 2048

     

  12. Click Next

     

  13. Select a location for the request file

     

  14. Click Finish

 

Fulfill the Certificate Signing Request (CSR)

We need to take the CSR generated in the last step to a third party SSL certificate provider. I choose to use GoDaddy. Here are GoDaddy’s instructions to fulfill the CSR at their site – Requesting a Standard or Wildcard SSL Certificate. Once the certificate is issued, download the completed CSR to the AD FS server.

 

Complete the Certificate Request (CSR)

 

  1. Open Server Manager

     

  2. Click Tools

     

  3. Click Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager

     

  4. Select the local server

     

  5. Select Server Certificates

     

  6. Click Open Feature (actions pane)

     

  7. Click Complete Certificate Request

     

  8. Select the path to the complete CSR file that you competed and downloaded from the third party certificate provider

     

  9. Enter the friendly name for the certificate

     

  10. Select Personal as the certificate store

     

  11. Click OK

     

  12. The certificate will be added

     

***Note*** The certificate shown below is a multi-name SSL certificate for my lab environment. When your certificate is added, it should show sts.domain.com, which matches the request.

 

Assign the Completed SSL Certificate

 

Now that we have the third party certificate completed on the server, we need to assign and bind it to the default website (HTTPS port 443).

  1. Expand the local server

     

  2. Expand Sites

     

  3. Select Default Web Site

     

  4. Click Bindings (actions pane)

     

  5. Click Add

     

  6. Change the type to HTTPS

     

  7. Select your certificate from the drop down menu.

     

    ***Note*** The certificate shown below is a multi-name SSL certificate for my lab environment. When you select your certificate, it should show sts.domain.com, which matches the competed certificate.

     

  8. Click OK

     

  9. Click Close

     

  10. Close IIS Manager

 

Getting to know the NEW Office 365

  1. Does Microsoft have FREE training for the NEW Office 365?
  2. Signing up for the NEW Office 365
  3. Adding and Verifying a Domain for the NEW Office 365
  4. Creating Cloud Users for the NEW Office 365
  5. Configuring Desktops for the NEW Office 365
  6. Exchange 2003 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  7. Exchange 2007 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  8. Setting up AD FS and Enabling Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  9. Setting up AD FS Proxy Servers for Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  10. Setting up Directory Synchronization with the NEW Office 365
  11. Activating and Licensing a Synchronized User in the NEW Office 365
  12. Testing Single Sign-on to the NEW Office 365
  13. Making the Single Sign-On Solution Highly Available
  14. Exchange Hybrid Deployment with the NEW Office 365

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

Email Me Follow me on Twitter Connect with me on LinkedIN Facebook Me

Part 1 – Prepare the Local AD FS Server

Before we can federate with Office 365, we need to prepare and install the prerequisite accounts and software.

 

Create Service Account

Best practices state that AD FS should be installed with a service account. This prevents the AD FS service from running under another user account. This eliminates a number of potential issues

 

  1. Login to your Domain Controller with an Administrator Account

     

  2. Open Active Directory Users and Computers

     

  3. Create a Service Account for AD FS

     

     

     

  4. Add Service Account to local Administrator Group on the AD FS Server

 

Install AD FS Server Role

 

  1. Login to the AD FS server with the AD FS service account

     

  2. Open Server Manager

     

  3. Click Manage

     

  4. Click Add Roles and Features

     

  5. Click Next

     

  6. Select Role-based or feature-based installation

     

  7. Click Next

     

  8. Select the local server

     

  9. Click Next

     

  10. Select Active Directory Federation Services

     

  11. Click Add Features, this will install the required features for AD FS

     

  12. Click Next

     

  13. Select .NET Framework 3.5 Features

     

  14. Click Next

     

  15. Click Next

     

  16. Select Federation Service (selected by default)

     

  17. Click Next

     

  18. Click Next

     

  19. Leave default selections for the Web Server Role (IIS)

     

  20. Click Next

     

  21. Click Install

     

  22. Install begins. You can close this window or leave it open to view the progress

     

    Installation completed

     

  23. Click Close

 

Install Sign-in Assistant

 

  1. Open Internet Explorer

     

  2.  

  3. Click Download
    Software

     

  4. Click Desktop Setup

     

  5. Click Set up to start the Desktop Applications install

     

  6. Click Run

     

  7. Desktop Assistant is downloaded

     

  8. Click Run

     

  9. Sign in with a Global Administrator account for Office 365.

     

    I create a shared service account for use with AD FS and Directory Sync. This account does not need a license assigned and should be a tenant account (@domain.onmicrosoft.com). Assign the account the Global Administrator role. Use this BLOG post for setting up the user.

     

     

  10. Desktop Applications setup starts

     

  11. Uncheck (if checked) Microsoft Outlook, Microsoft SharePoint and Microsoft Lync

     

  12. Click Continue

     

  13. Click Run

     

  14. Click I Accept

     

  15. Installing Microsoft Online Sign-In Assistant

     

  16. Click Finish

 

Install the Windows Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell

 

  1.  

  2. Click Users and Groups

     

  3. Click Set up link beside Single Sign-On

     

  4. Chose Windows 64-bit Version

     

  5. Click Download

     

  6. Click Run

     

  7. Click Next

     

  8. Accept the License Agreement

     

  9. Click Next

     

  10. Choose and install path

     

  11. Click Next

     

  12. Click Install

     

  13. Click Finish

 

This completes setting up all the pre-required software for the AD FS server.

 

Complete Series:

Getting to know the NEW Office 365

  1. Does Microsoft have FREE training for the NEW Office 365?
  2. Signing up for the NEW Office 365
  3. Adding and Verifying a Domain for the NEW Office 365
  4. Creating Cloud Users for the NEW Office 365
  5. Configuring Desktops for the NEW Office 365
  6. Exchange 2003 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  7. Exchange 2007 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  8. Setting up AD FS and Enabling Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  9. Setting up AD FS Proxy Servers for Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  10. Setting up Directory Synchronization with the NEW Office 365
  11. Activating and Licensing a Synchronized User in the NEW Office 365
  12. Testing Single Sign-on to the NEW Office 365
  13. Making the Single Sign-On Solution Highly Available
  14. Exchange Hybrid Deployment with the NEW Office 365

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

Email Me Follow me on Twitter Connect with me on LinkedIN Facebook Me

Setting up AD FS and Enabling Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365

In order to enable Single Sign-on with the NEW Office 365, there are a number of steps that need to happen. This series of posts will cover setting up the AD FS server and completing the federation process with Office 365. Before you try to setup federation it’s always a good idea to document your solution. This will make it a lot easier to achieve your end goal. This will be the end goal architecture for setting up AD FS, AD FS Proxies and Directory Synchronization.

This is a typical highly available setup into Office 365. Ideally this server will be installed as virtual servers on multiple Hyper-V hosts. Think about redundancy, not only in the virtual servers, but in the Hyper-V servers as well. Install one AD FS and one AD FS Proxy on one Hyper-V host and the other AD FS and AD FS Proxy on another Hyper-V host. This prevents loss of service from a hardware failure. Keep in mind that once you are using Single Sign-on with Office 365, you rely on your local Active Directory for authentication. Later on in the Getting to Know the NEW Office 365 series, I will cover how to make these roles highly available. For now we will install single roles to get the service up and running.

 

 

Prepare the Base Servers

 

After reviewing the architecture above, you will notice that I am using Windows Server 2012 for the base OS on all the server roles.

AD FS Server

  1. Base build the AD FS server with Windows Server 2012
  2. Setup a connection to the internal network
  3. Add the server to the local domain
  4. Update the server with all Windows Updates

AD FS Proxy Server

  1. Base Build the AD FS Proxy server with Windows Server 2012
  2. Setup a connection to the DMZ network (verify connectivity to the AD FS server on port 443)
  3. DO NOT add the server to the local domain
  4. Update the server with all Windows Updates

Directory Sync Server

  1. Base build the Directory Synchronization server with Windows Server 2012
  2. Setup a connection to the internal network
  3. Add the server to the local domain
  4. Update the server with all Windows Updates

 

Prepare Active Directory

 

Add UPN Suffix

If you are using and internal domain name that doesn’t match the domain that you want to federate with Office 365 you will have to add a custom UPN suffix that matches that external name space. If you need to add the UPN suffix, please follow these instructions, http://support.microsoft.com/kb/243629

Example

Internal Domain Name – contoso.local

Desired Federated Domain – contoso.com

 

Clean up Active Directory

This makes sense for so many reasons, but the most for Directory Sync. We can filter the OUs that we want to sync to Office 365; you can checkout this BLOG post on how to do that. I generally make an OU for all the Office 365 Services; then create more OUs within that one for all the user accounts, services accounts, groups, servers and computers. This will allow us to filter on user accounts and groups when we enable Directory Synchronization with Office 365. The less number of objects that you sync with Office 365 is better. If you have thousands of objects replicating, that don’t need to be, things will get messy really quick. Keep it clean and neat. This will prevent mistakes and keep you head ache free.

 

Complete Series:

Getting to know the NEW Office 365

  1. Does Microsoft have FREE training for the NEW Office 365?
  2. Signing up for the NEW Office 365
  3. Adding and Verifying a Domain for the NEW Office 365
  4. Creating Cloud Users for the NEW Office 365
  5. Configuring Desktops for the NEW Office 365
  6. Exchange 2003 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  7. Exchange 2007 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  8. Setting up AD FS and Enabling Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  9. Setting up AD FS Proxy Servers for Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  10. Setting up Directory Synchronization with the NEW Office 365
  11. Activating and Licensing a Synchronized User in the NEW Office 365
  12. Testing Single Sign-on to the NEW Office 365
  13. Making the Single Sign-On Solution Highly Available
  14. Exchange Hybrid Deployment with the NEW Office 365

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

Email Me Follow me on Twitter Connect with me on LinkedIN Facebook Me

Exchange 2007 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365

I covered this topic in a BLOG post for MS Press. Please click the link below and you will be re-directed there.

From the MVPs: Exchange 2007 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365

 

Complete Series:

Getting to know the NEW Office 365

  1. Does Microsoft have FREE training for the NEW Office 365?
  2. Signing up for the NEW Office 365
  3. Adding and Verifying a Domain for the NEW Office 365
  4. Creating Cloud Users for the NEW Office 365
  5. Configuring Desktops for the NEW Office 365
  6. Exchange 2003 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  7. Exchange 2007 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  8. Setting up AD FS and Enabling Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  9. Setting up AD FS Proxy Servers for Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  10. Setting up Directory Synchronization with the NEW Office 365
  11. Activating and Licensing a Synchronized User in the NEW Office 365
  12. Testing Single Sign-on to the NEW Office 365
  13. Making the Single Sign-On Solution Highly Available
  14. Exchange Hybrid Deployment with the NEW Office 365

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

Email Me Follow me on Twitter Connect with me on LinkedIN Facebook Me

Exchange 2003 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365

A cut over migration is the simplest way to get all your existing email into Office 365. As the name implies, it’s a cutover from one service to another. Cutover migrations are supported for Exchange 2003, 2007 and 2010; for organizations with fewer than 1000 mailboxes. The setup and process is straight forward and nothing complicated. With any successful migration, some planning and testing of existing infrastructure is invaluable. Make sure that you plan and test the migration prior to trying to implement.

 

PLANNING

Before we can attempt the migration, we need to know what we are going. Microsoft has done a great job of providing good quality information for administrators to use, to plan the migration to Office 365. I always use the Exchange Deployment Assistant as a guide for all my migrations. This site is up to date and will cover most of all the migrations scenarios to Office 365

  1.  

  2. Once the site is launched, you are presented three options. Since I am doing a simple cutover migration from Exchange Server 2003, I am going to use the Cloud Only option

     

  3. Click Cloud Only

     

  4. You are now asked a series of questions on end state goals and existing setup

     

  5. Answer all the questions

     

  6. Click the next arrow

     

  7. The Exchange Deployment Assistant will generate a step by step guide for you to follow. Make sure to read and understand what you are doing.

 

TESTING EXISTING SETUP

 

Using our guide from the Exchange Deployment Assistant, we need to make sure that our Exchange 2003 infrastructure supports RPC over HTTP and Outlook Anywhere. Use the guide to verify the Exchange 2003 setup. Once the setup is verified to be correct, use the Microsoft Remote Connectivity Analyzer to verify RPC over HTTP and Outlook Anywhere.

  1.  

  2. Select the Outlook Anywhere (RPC over HTTP) test

     

  3. Click Next

     

  4. Enter all the information that is requested. Keep in mind that with Exchange 2003, using autodiscover to detect the settings will not work. Exchange 2003 doesn’t support autodiscover. These values will have to be entered manually

     

  5. Enter the Verification code

     

  6. Click Perform Test

     

  7. The test will start

     

  8. Once the test is successful, you can continue to the next step. If it’s successful with warnings, review the warnings and correct them if needed. I get a warning here, because I am using a multi-name UCC certificate. If the test fails, use the report generated and the guide (Exchange Deployment Assistant) to resolve the issues.

 

CONFIGURE CUTOVER MIGRATION

 

  1.  

  2. Open Exchange Admin Center

     

  3. Click Migration

     

  4. Click the drop down menu and select Migrate to Exchange Online

     

  5. Select Cutover migration (supported by Exchange Server 2003 and later versions

     

  6. Click Next

     

  7. Enter on-premises account credentials

     

  8. Click Next

     

  9. Enter the on-premise Exchange Server

     

  10. Enter the RPC Proxy Server

     

  11. Click Next

     

  12. Enter a name for the New Migration Batch

     

  13. Click Next

     

  14. Select a user from Office 365 to get a report once the migration is completed. You can choose to automatically strat the batch or manually start the batch later.

     

  15. Click New

     

  16. The new migration batch is created and the status is set to syncing

 

This is where we wait for the migration to happen. Depending on the number of accounts and the ammount of data, this can take some time. You can view the migration details, by clicking View Details under the Maibox Status.

You will see the accounts provisionig on the Office 365 account and then start to sync from Exchange 2003 to Office 365.

Provisioning

Syncing

 

COMPLETE THE MIGRATION

 

When all the accounts are provisioned and the sync from Exchange 2003 to Office 365 is completed, you will get a report emailed to you. Once you get the report, you can complete the migration process.

  1. Migrate Public Folders – Microsoft has released a whitepaper for the companies that have public folders to migrate to Office 365. Migrate from Exchange Public Folders to Microsoft Office 365
  2. Assign Office 365 licenses to all the users. Use this BLOG post and jump to the section about assigning licenses – Creating Cloud Users for the NEW Office 365
  3. Verify that all the DNS records are updated and pointed towards Office 365 services. Use the DNS section in this BLOG post – Adding and Verifying a Domain for the NEW Office 365.  WARNING – Once you change the MX record to point at Office 365, there is some DNS replication time. During this time email will be delivered to either Exchange 2003 or Office 365. It’s important to keep your migration batch job running for up to 72 hours after switching the MX record.
  4. Configure the desktops to use Office 365 services – Use this BLOG post – Configuring Desktops for the NEW Office 365
  5. Once you are comfortable that all the email is migrated to Office 365 and the MX record DNS replication is completed, you can stop the migration batch job.

 

At this point the migration is complete and you can retire your Exchange 2003 services. Everyone should be happy cloud users.

Complete Series:

Getting to know the NEW Office 365

  1. Does Microsoft have FREE training for the NEW Office 365?
  2. Signing up for the NEW Office 365
  3. Adding and Verifying a Domain for the NEW Office 365
  4. Creating Cloud Users for the NEW Office 365
  5. Configuring Desktops for the NEW Office 365
  6. Exchange 2003 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  7. Exchange 2007 Cutover Migration to the NEW Office 365
  8. Setting up AD FS and Enabling Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  9. Setting up AD FS Proxy Servers for Single Sign-On to the NEW Office 365
  10. Setting up Directory Synchronization with the NEW Office 365
  11. Activating and Licensing a Synchronized User in the NEW Office 365
  12. Testing Single Sign-on to the NEW Office 365
  13. Making the Single Sign-On Solution Highly Available
  14. Exchange Hybrid Deployment with the NEW Office 365

Thanks for visiting and reading my posts. I am always looking for more ideas. Please comment or email me with what you would like to see.

Kelsey Epps

Office 365 MVP

Email Me Follow me on Twitter Connect with me on LinkedIN Facebook Me